Precision Implant Dentistry

How much are dentures?

Dentures may seem like they cost a lot. That said, they are usually the cheapest way to replace a full mouth of teeth.

The total price of dentures can vary greatly, however. So can the quality of what you get!

Let’s take a look at how much you should expect to pay and other things you should be aware of.

Dentures cost factors

Not all dentures are created equal.

The least expensive economy dentures are made from a brittle, pink plastic. The teeth are the same material, but white.

These denture teeth wear down quickly with use. The body of the denture tends to crack easily as well. They also may not fit as well as a higher quality denture.

You may pay less on the front end, but expect to have to replace economy dentures in a short time. Usually, they need to be replaced every couple of years.

A higher quality denture will have an acrylic body with special teeth made from acrylic or porcelain. These dentures are much stronger, look more natural, and tend to last for 5-7 years on average.

If you haven’t lost all your teeth, you may want a partial denture. These replace only missing teeth and lock on to the teeth you have remaining.

Just like complete dentures, partial dentures can vary in quality and price.

The cheapest economy partial will be made from pink plastic. It will have pieces of bent wire sticking out that wrap around teeth. These tend to be thicker and heavier to prevent breaking.

A better made partial will have a thin metal framework. Cast metal clasps will custom fit to your teeth. Where visible, the metal is covered with pink acrylic and special wear resistant teeth.

There is also a new style of partials made from a special acrylic that flexes slightly. This gives the strength of high-quality partials without the metal framework.

The nice thing is that the clasps are the same color as the gums. This makes them less noticeable in the mouth.

The average cost of dentures

The quality and needs of each patient will determine the total cost of a denture. Let’s break down what you may expect to pay for each kind.

Full dentures

The economy denture mentioned above will likely run $300-$600 per arch (meaning top or bottom).

Again, it’s less on the front end, but expect to replace these types of dentures in a short time. Replace them a few times and you could have paid for a longer lasting, better looking and fitting denture.

Investing in a nicer set of acrylic dentures with long-lasting teeth will cost from $1000-$3000 each. Certain custom made dentures can run $4000 or more per arch.

Partial dentures

Economy partials cost about the same as economy dentures. Expect to be charged $300-$600 per arch.

They come with the same issues as economy dentures as well, with the addition of wire clasps that often need adjusting.

Metal-framework partials cost around $900-$2000 each but are much more comfortable and durable. Because they attach to remaining teeth, they are much more stable and functional as well.

Immediate dentures

Often there are teeth that need to be removed before you can make a denture. It can take several months for the bone to heal and reshape where the teeth once were.

You can choose to wait until the bone is completely healed, but most people don’t want to go without teeth for that long.

As an alternative, dentists often offer immediate dentures.

Immediate dentures are made in a special way. The inside of the denture can be added to later on. The denture is made prior to tooth extractions and placed the day the teeth come out.

During healing, the denture will likely become loose and won’t fit well. It can be relined, however. That means adding acrylic to the inside to correct the fit.

Expect several relines before healing is complete.

Immediate dentures are normally more expensive than traditional ones. They may cost $1500-$3200 per arch. Also, add on the cost of the extractions and any bone surgeries necessary.

Extractions generally cost $75-$150 per tooth for non-surgical or $200-$400 per tooth for surgical extractions.

Denture implants (snap-in & permanent)

Since complete dentures just rest directly on the gums, they tend to move around when you eat and talk.

Even the best fitting complete denture is only held in place by suction. The ability to chew is much less than if you had teeth anchored to bone. To overcome this issue, you may consider an implant denture.

Implant dentures snap on to four to six dental implants which are attached to the bone of your jaw. This creates a much more stable set of teeth with greatly improved chewing ability.

Each snap-on implant denture itself may cost $4000-$6000 (per arch), but the larger expense comes from the implants. A set of dental implants may cost as much as $20,000-$50,000, depending on several factors.

And that’s per arch.

These snap on dentures are still taken out during each night, much like conventional dentures. They also have to be replaced every 5-7 years.

Another option, if you don’t want teeth that are removable, are fixed bridges.

Implant supported fixed bridges offer even better stability, function, and appearance than snap on dentures. In addition, they don’t come in and out of the mouth. These restorations are permanently attached and can last a lifetime.

The cost of implant-supported bridges can seem high, but many patients opt for this treatment route. It is the closest thing to having your natural teeth.

The G4 Implant Solution by Golpa is a cost-effective version of implant bridges that can replace an entire mouth of teeth, permanently and beautifully, in just one 24 hour period.

Other costs related to dentures

When people are looking for dentures, they often only look at the initial cost. There are other factors that should be accounted for, however.

If you choose to get an economy denture, expect them to only last a couple of years. The soft plastic teeth wear down quickly and cannot be replaced. Flat teeth are very difficult to chew with.

Economy dentures are also often brittle and prone to break. A repair on an economy denture may cost as much as a new one.

If you have no teeth, your bone tends to change and shrink over time. This can create situations where dentures no longer fit.

To overcome this you may need to have your denture relined. This means adding to the acrylic inside the denture to make it fit again.

Even with the best-made dentures, expect a reline every few years. A hard reline on a complete denture may cost $250-$500. If the denture is cracked or broken, a simple repair may run $100-$250.

If the crack is large, it may have to have all the acrylic replaced. This is called a rebase and may cost $400-$750.

Implant supported dentures do not generally require relines, however. The implants help stimulate and maintain bone. In addition, these types of dentures have increased stability because they attach to the implants.

What is the most cost-effective option?

When deciding on what is best for your health and for your smile, there are many things to consider.

Conventional dentures tend to be the least expensive treatment initially. There are further costs that arise from repairs, relines, and replacements, however.

Additionally, conventional dentures don’t work, look, or feel like your natural teeth. Even the best dentures have much less chewing ability than the real thing. They also come in and out of your mouth and have to be replaced eventually.

When it comes to value for your dollar, the G4 Implant Solution by Golpa may be the best treatment available. These fixed bridges are the next best thing to having your natural teeth again! They look incredible, function like real teeth, and can last a lifetime.

G4 Implant Centers are located across the US. Schedule a phone consultation today to learn more!